Book Reviews
VILLANOVA MAGAZINE
FALL 2005
By Maureen McKew
Senior Writer
 
 
BOUNDLESS AMBITION AND A VORACIOUS APPETITE FOR PAYBACK
 
Although set in 1950s Pennsylvania and Washington, Inquisition tells a tale of personal ambition and political corruption that could easily fit the political mores of certain 2005 politicians and their handlers.
 
The fast-paced novel jumps back and forth among three decades, while presenting a colorfil supporting cast of characters ... readers should find a very comfortable chair, because they'll want to read it in one sitting.
 
 
BALTIMORE SUNDAY SUN
ARTS & SOCIETY
FEBRUARY 13, 2005
Review By James H. Bready, Book Critic
 
Inquisition
 
By Jack Eddinger. AuthorHouse. 273 pages. $29.25
 
It is 1956; Adlai E. Stevenson runs against Dwight D. Eisenhower, and in northeast Pennsylvania a veteran Democratic congressman named Zachary Taylor Harris is up to his earlobes in hanky-panky. To win re-election, big, Zach figures he'll have to deal with the FBI and the underworld, idealists and witch hunters. Plus wife, plus mistress.
 
Eyes closed, Jack Eddinger could work this terrain - originally a Pennsylvanian, he has been a newspaperman (Evening Sun, Washington Star), City Hall press secretary and Capitol Hill aide. In his novel's saturnine take on public life, the national motto could be "Outta My Way."
 
Eddinger pictures an FBI director and a witness with a Communist background (not quite named Hoover and Hiss); his Lenape (Lehigh) Valley steel colossus is Bessemer, not Bethlehem. A few pages out - amid the rivers of booze, the manuals for corruption - and Inquisition's readers may need both hands, holding onto his or her soul .
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